Breeze Airways, Neeleman’s latest venture shows off its brand image

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Meet Breeze, previously known as Moxy, has shed off its cloak of mystery and revealed its new name, logo and livery. Breeze Airways is currently applying for its airline operating certificate with the FAA as well as US DoT and hopes to be flying by the end of 2020.

This is no fly-by-night. Breeze will be Mr Neeleman’s fifth airline start-up after his four successful new entrants Morris Air, WestJet, JetBlue and Azul. It’s no surprise that the airline has yet again celebrated blue as one of its core colour schemes.

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As for it’s business model, Breeze’s initial markets will be mid-sized U.S. city pairs that currently have no nonstop service – and there are plenty of them! The airline start-up plans to connect these cities with low-fare, high-quality nonstop flights, with new consumer technology innovations, improving the flying experience while saving travelers both time and money – basically JetBlue for the US.

“Breeze will fly non-stop service between places currently without meaningful or affordable service,” said Breeze’s CEO and President David Neeleman. “20 years ago, we brought humanity back to the airline industry with JetBlue. Today, we’re excited to introduce plans for ‘the World’s Nicest Airline’.”

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Now, as for the brand, there’s a nod to retro-futuristic with a typeface that blends both warm Americana and Space Odyssey 2001. Like Azul, naturally some of the letters are in a different shade of blue, and this time, with a ‘tick’ over the letters E and Z, Stelios might be raising an eyebrow, as it hints at the fact it’s an ‘easy’ (US citizens will spell that phonetically) airline.

Interestingly, the airline has done a bizarre thing with their logo. On the reverse side of the aircraft the tick naturally is reversed to follow the contour of the tail fin, but the airline has also reversed the tick above the logo too. We would have expected them to keep the logo sacrosanct but seem happy to bastardise it, even this early on in the brand’s life.

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